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Writings of 1738-1740 (III) – Writings for music 1720-1740

Œuvres complètes de Voltaire
Vol. No.
Vol. No.: 

18C

Volume editor(s)
Volume editor(s): 
Russell Goulbourne, Raymond Trousson et al.
Author: 
Voltaire
Publication Date
Publication Date: 
2008
ISBN
ISBN: 
978-0-7294-0913-1
Pages
Pages: 
456
Price Sterling (£): 
110

About the Book

About the Book: 

When Rameau took the world of opera by storm in 1733, Voltaire set aside his first libretto, Tanis et Zélide, and wrote Samson and later Pandore with the composer specifically in mind. All three libretti depict rebellion against established religions, culminating in spectacular scenes: Isis and Osiris destroying the temple at Memphis; Samson bringing down the temple, crushing himself and the Philistines; and Prometheus and the Titans doing battle against the Roman gods.

Table of Contents

Lettre à Monsieur Rameau (Edition critique par Gerhardt Stenger)
Remarques sur deux épîtres d’Helvétius (Critical edition by David Williams)
Conseils de Voltaire à Helvétius sur la composition et sur le choix du sujet d’une épître morale (Critical edition by David Williams)
Divertissement mis en musique, pour une fête donnée par Monsieur André à Madame la maréchale de Villars (Edition critique par Roger J. V. Cotte)
Tanis et Zélide (Critical edition by Gillian Pink and Roger J. V. Cotte)
Samson (Critical edition by Russell Goulbourne)
Pandore (Edition critique par Raymond Trousson)

Reviews

Reviews: 

Eighteenth-century Music

Musicologists specializing in the French Baroque owe a debt of gratitude to the Voltaire Foundation […] Voltaire’s lyric tragedies are dramatically interesting and fun to read […] Readers will appreciate the presentation of these volumes, which are up to the Voltaire Foundation’s high standards. […] As additions to the new critical edition, the volumes reviewed here are valuable research tools, compiled with care and clear in what they set out to accomplish. They are outstanding contributions to our research, and our debt of gratitude can only grow accordingly.

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