Œuvres de 1749 (II)

Author: Voltaire

Volume: 31B

Series: Œuvres complètes de Voltaire

Volume Editors: Henri Duranton, Marie-Rose de Labriolle, Ralph A. Nablow, Mark Waddicor

Publication Date: 1994

Pages: 593

ISBN: 978-0-7294-0427-3

Price: £105


About

The year 1749 was to prove a sombre one for Voltaire. His relationships with Mme Du Châtelet and Mme Denis were both in highly emotional and uncertain stages, culminating in Voltaire’s utter devastation at the death of Mme Du Châtelet in September, and his ensuing need to lay the foundations of a new existence, initially in Paris and with his oldest friends. It is against this backdrop that one must envisage his literary activities in 1749. This year saw the highly successful comedy Nanine published, together with propaganda works arguing in favour of increasing the commodity and beauty of Paris, the capital from which he spent so much of his life an exile. At a time of crisis for Voltaire both in his personal relations and at court, he also wrote a the poem ‘La vie de Paris et de Versailles’ which acts as a love poem to Mme Denis as much as a satire on Parisian society.

Table of contents

Nanine (Marie-Rose de Labriolle) Lettre à messieurs les auteurs des Etrennes de la Saint-Jean et autres beaux ouvrages (Mark Waddicor) Des embellissements de Paris (Mark Waddicor) Des embellisements de la ville de Cachemire (Mark Waddicor) La Vie de Paris et de Versailles (Mark Waddicor) Lettre à l’occasion de l’impôt du vingtième (Henri Duranton) Des mensonges imprimés (Mark Waddicor) Eclaircissements sur quelques charges de la maison du roi (Mark Waddicor) Panégyrique de saint Louis (Mark Waddicor) Minor verse of 1749 (Ralph A. Nablow): A Mme Du Bocage, ‘Milton, dont vous suivez les traces’ A Mme Du Bocage, ‘En vain Milton’ A Mme Du Bocage, sur son ‘Paradis perdu’ A Mme de Boufflers, qui s’appelait Madeleine Sur le Louvre A M. de La P*** en lui envoyant un exemplaire de ‘Sémiramis’

Reviews

The work of the editors so far mentioned is never less than competent and often impressively thorough, but that of Mark Waddicor is quite exceptional, both in the range and depth of his expertise and the clarity with which he communicates the results of his research to his reader. […]  This is an exemplary exercise in the editor’s art.

Richard Waller, French Studies 53.3 (1999)

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